Drawing Board Production’s “Bedwetter” at the Windsor-Walkerville Fringe

Drawing Board Production’s latest creation, Bedwetter, depicts the real life trials and victories of Tamlynn Bryson, the co-creator and story-teller. Directed and co-created by Kyle Kimmerly, Bryson reflects on her childhood from ages seven to fifteen and what it feels like to have “accidents” even when entering into young womanhood.

What I loved the most about the piece was its breathtaking honesty. I can’t imagine what it must be like to talk about a difficult part of your past so openly with groups full of strangers every day. But Bryson fearlessly shares her story, and knowing that every element and emotion expressed in the play is true gives a gravity to the levity she’s able to make of the situation now. 

Part of that levity comes from the ability with which Bryson is able to switch from one character to another in her story. Her changes in physicality and voice that accompany each new personality create her world for us while showcasing the immense talent of the actress. Even Kimmerly gets in on the action, doing Goofy-cartoon style voiceover instructions for some of Bryson’s more trying sleepovers.


The pop culture references which were included in the show were very powerful; they showcase not only what is put out in the media about bedwetters, but also how inundated we are with those references and therefore what we’re supposed to think about them. The majority of them came from comedy shows, where the bedwetter was always the butt of the joke. It was especially impactful to hear them drown out Bryson’s own positive voice: a perfect example of how negative media affects us, no matter how loud we think that positive voice is. 

 And these perceptions changed so drastically over time for Bryson as well, going from being open and honest about her situation to hiding it from virtually everyone in her life. It was difficult to watch as her self-esteem is broken down little by little by characters she’s playing herself. But it so accurately depicted what it’s like being a teen who’s maybe a little outside of “normal” that everyone is able to connect to her story. 

You need to check out this hysterically self-referencial, moving, and engaging show at the Olde Walkerville Theatre July 26th at 1:15pm, July 27th at 7pm, July 28th at 5pm and July 29 at 3:45.

Photography: Corey Palmer

Photo Editing: Larissa Nodwell